Federal grant hopes to connect Marylanders to the internet


More Maryland residents are just one click away from faster and more reliable internet service. On Thursday, the state got a $95 million federal grant to help families and students get online. During the critical stages of the coronavirus pandemic, Maryland students had to leave school and learn from home. For many, there was a problem, access to the internet.To help solve that issue, the federal government has set aside an additional $10 billion to help states like Maryland carry out technology projects. The money is coming from the American Rescue Plan’s Coronavirus Capital Projects Fund.”Your ability to both work from home and learn from home was critical for economic for academic for any type of economic viability,” Gene Sperling of the U.S. Department of the Treasury, said.A few years ago, we heard the cries of Baltimore City students struggling to learn online.”Every morning our family has to decide who has priority to use internet, my parents who need to work and provide for our family or me and my sisters who need to pass our classes,” Baltimore City College student Kimberly Vasquez said in 2020.In this latest round of funding, Maryland is getting $95 million to help connect more than 16,000 homes and businesses to high-speed internet service. That will cover at least a third of the state dealing with technology issues.”It’s important in rural areas, and of course, that connectivity piece is essential there. I will also say it’s important in urban areas like Baltimore City and in suburban areas,” Maryland Sen. Chris Van Hollen said.As part of the federal grant, low-income residents will also get a break on their monthly internet bill.The federal government is calling this latest round of funding a down payment on what’s needed to improve internet service both in schools and homes.

More Maryland residents are just one click away from faster and more reliable internet service. On Thursday, the state got a $95 million federal grant to help families and students get online.

During the critical stages of the coronavirus pandemic, Maryland students had to leave school and learn from home. For many, there was a problem, access to the internet.

To help solve that issue, the federal government has set aside an additional $10 billion to help states like Maryland carry out technology projects. The money is coming from the American Rescue Plan’s Coronavirus Capital Projects Fund.

“Your ability to both work from home and learn from home was critical for economic for academic for any type of economic viability,” Gene Sperling of the U.S. Department of the Treasury, said.

A few years ago, we heard the cries of Baltimore City students struggling to learn online.

“Every morning our family has to decide who has priority to use internet, my parents who need to work and provide for our family or me and my sisters who need to pass our classes,” Baltimore City College student Kimberly Vasquez said in 2020.

In this latest round of funding, Maryland is getting $95 million to help connect more than 16,000 homes and businesses to high-speed internet service. That will cover at least a third of the state dealing with technology issues.

“It’s important in rural areas, and of course, that connectivity piece is essential there. I will also say it’s important in urban areas like Baltimore City and in suburban areas,” Maryland Sen. Chris Van Hollen said.

As part of the federal grant, low-income residents will also get a break on their monthly internet bill.

The federal government is calling this latest round of funding a down payment on what’s needed to improve internet service both in schools and homes.



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